Grand Bandicoot

Reconstruction of Galadi grandis – Art by Dorothy Dunphy (Archer et al. 1994)

Reconstruction of Galadi grandis
Art by Dorothy Dunphy (Archer et al. 1994)

Galadi grandis (Grand Bandicoot) was a large bandicoot from the early Miocene of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland, Australia. It co-existed at the same time as Galadi speciosus (Beautiful Bandicoot) and probably preyed on larger species. It is represented by a well preserved jaw and several isolated teeth.

 

Body size estimate

Around 1.5 kg

Distribution and locality

Galadi grandis is known only from the Riversleigh World Heritage Fossil Site in northwestern Queensland. It is found in the following sites:

Faunal Zone B (Early Miocene) – Camel Sputum Site, Creaser’s Rampart Site, Mike’s Menagerie Site, Ross Scott-Orr (RSO) Site, Wayne’s Wok Site.

Fossil jaw of Galadi grandis. Scale bar = 2cm

Fossil jaw of Galadi grandis. Scale bar = 2cm

Habitat

It is found in Faunal Zone B and is considered to be a rainforest environment.

Feeding and Diet

Galadi grandis was predominantly faunivorous, feeding on small animals and may have occupied a niche that is now occupied by dasyurids.

Fossil material

Galadi grandis is known from 16 specimens which includes an almost complete lower jaw, and several isolated teeth.

Evolutionary Relationships

The latest phylogeny places Galadi grandis outside the group in which all modern bandicoots and bilbies belong. It therefore belong to an ancient lineage of bandicoots, which evolutionary relationship is yet to be understood.

Classification

Kingdom:
Animalia
Phylum:
Chordata
Class:
Mammalia
Cohort:
Marsupialia
Order:
Peramelemorphia
Family:
Incertae sedis
Genus:
Galadi
Species:
grandis

References

  • Travouillon, K.J., Gurovich, Y., Archer, M., Hand, S. J.  and Muirhead, J., 2013. The genus Galadi: three new bandicoots (Marsupialia; Peramelemorphia) from Riversleigh’s Miocene deposits, north-western Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33, 153–168.

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